Phoenix Theatre

Phoenix Theatre

Charing Cross Road, London, WC2H 0JG

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What’s On

  • The Girls

    (29 Mar 2017 to 21 Sep 2017)

    A new musical by Gary Barlow and Tim Firth comes to the Phoenix Theatre in February 2017. The Girls...

    Buy tickets

Location

The Phoenix Theatre is located on the bustling Charing Cross Road, very close to Leicester Square. It is situated in the heart of London and many areas are within walking distance such as Piccadilly and Oxford Street. Charing Cross Road itself is the home of several famous bookshops, and there are many restaurants, cafés and bars in the local area for theatregoers to visit.
Getting there
By bus: The Phoenix Theatre is as equally close to Leicester Square tube station as it is to Tottenham Court Road, so depending on which line you are travelling on, alight at either one of these, and the theatre is on Charing Cross Road. Leicester Square is on the Piccadilly and Northern lines, and Tottenham Court Road is on the Central and Northern lines.By bus: Numbers 19, 22, 24, 38, 40 and 176 all stop close to the theatre.By taxi or car: The nearest car park is the Q-Park at Chinatown. Q-Park participates in a half-price theatre parking scheme which enables you to use the car parks for half the price if you can present your theatre tickets. If you are planning to hail a taxi after a performance, then it should be easy as Charing Cross Road is a main road and there will be plenty of black cabs about.

Seating

The Phoenix Theatre has quite a large seating capacity of 1,012 people on three levels – Stalls, Dress Circle and Upper Circle. As you can see from the seating plan on the right, the Stalls are the largest section and are closest to the stage. They are located on the ground floor of the auditorium and offer great views from most seats, especially central ones towards the front. They are also usually the most expensive tickets, but the price decreases the further back you go. The section is divided into two symmetrical sections by a central aisle. All seats fall within the proscenium and are unrestricted, providing great views of the stage. Due to the height of the stage and the rake used within the performance it is wise to sit further back, around row H or J to be at the best level.

Above the Stalls on level 1 is the Dress Circle. If you like to view the stage as a whole and being so close doesn’t bother you, then seats here might be the ones for you as views are excellent, especially towards the front. The further back you go, the price drops but you may feel a little cut-off from the action below. The rows run straight rather than curved, with a good rake, providing excellent views.

The highest seating area is the Upper Circle, situated above both the Stalls and Dress Circle. The Upper Circle has the cheapest tickets in the auditorium and is great if you are on a budget, but you may feel quite far from the stage unless you are in the front couple of rows.

  Phoenix Theatre
Phoenix Theatre

Accessibility

The Phoenix Theatre has seats spread across 3 levels: the Stalls, Dress Circle and Upper Circle. There is a step-free entrance via Flitcroft Street, or else there is one shallow step from the street to the main entrance. From the foyer there are 13 steps down to the Stalls, 21 steps up to the Dress Circle and 51 steps up to the Upper Circle, and there are no lifts servicing each floor. Concessions are available to all disabled patrons and their carers.

There is 1 space for a wheelchair user in Box C, as well as two unfixed chairs. Transfer seating is available into A28 of the Dress Circle, although the disabled person must be accompanied by another person as staff cannot assist with this. Wheelchairs can be stored by the front of house staff for the duration of the performance. There is an adapted toilet on the Dress Circle level in the Royal Room. All the bars require navigating a set of stairs, but drinks can be brought to patrons in their seats if required.

Sennheiser infra-red and induction loop systems are both installed within the auditorium, with headsets being collected from the foyer bar on Phoenix Street. Guide dogs are allowed into the theatre but not the main auditorium, so can be dog-sat by the management during the show.Access bookings telephone line 020 7492 9930 or access booking form

History

The Phoenix Theatre opened in 1930 with a production of Private Lives starring a young Laurence Olivier, and has hosted many other successful shows such as Into The Woods and That Baker’s Wife. The Grade II-listed building has a striking classical facade with white pillars, and has an auditorium capable of holding up to 1012 patrons. The playwright Noel Coward is particularly associated with the theatre, with its debut show having been a version of his play Private Lives and with the theatre also hosting an extremely successful later run of the Tonight plays. Consequently, the bar in the foyer of the theatre remains named after Coward to this day.

Other successful productions during the Phoenix’s history include John Gielgud’s Love for Love, which ran during the Second World War, a musical version of Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales that ran for 2000 performances from 1968, and the 1978 Tom Stoppard play Night and Day, which ran for two years in total.

The Phoenix Theatre was home to successful musical Blood Brothers, from 1991 acquiring famous stars to play roles in the show, including Melanie C and the Nolan Sisters. It became the longest-running production at the Phoenix Theatre, and indeed one of the longest-running productions ever in the West End before closing in 2012. The theatre is currently owned by the Ambassador Theatre Group and became the home of new Broadway musical Once in 2013 which played for just over 2 years.

Past shows