Savoy Theatre

Savoy Theatre

Savoy Court, The Strand, London, WC2R 0ET

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What’s On

  • Dreamgirls

    (21 Nov 2017 to 10 Feb 2018)

    Broadway's ultimate smash-hit musical Dreamgirls entertains at London's Savoy Theatre, starring...

    Buy tickets

Location

The Savoy Theatre is located on the Strand, a busy area for shopping and home to other theatres such as the Vaudeville and Adelphi. Close by are Covent Garden, Leicester Square and the River Thames, all within walking distance from the Savoy, and the famous Savoy Hotel is the theatre’s neighbour, with a health club and swimming pool situated on top of the theatre itself.
Getting there
By Tube: The closest tube stations to the Savoy Theatre are Embankment and Charing Cross, just a 2 minute walk down the Strand. Embankment is on the Bakerloo, Circle and District lines, with Charing Cross on the Bakerloo and Northern lines, making connections to the theatre quite simple.By bus: Numbers 1, 4, 6, 9, 11, 13, 15, 23, 26, 59, 68, 76, 77a, 91, 168, 171, 172, 176, 188, 243, 341, 521 and RV1 all stop close to the theatre.By taxi or car: The nearest car park is the Trafalgar Square Spring Gardens. On the Strand you should have no problem hailing a black cab.

Seating

The Savoy Theatre has a fairly large seating capacity of 1,158 people on three levels – Stalls, Dress Circle and Upper Circle. As you can see from the seating plan to the right, the Stalls are the closest seating section to the stage and present great views from most seats, even towards the back. Top-priced seats are towards the front in the centre, but a few rows back the price drops and you may find yourself a bargain as the view is not all too different. The Stalls exists as one large section, which is well raked, 63 steps below the main foyer. Most seats fall within the proscenium, meaning good views are possible throughout the section.

The next level up is the Dress Circle. Views from the front section are excellent and provide you with a panoramic view of the stage. As with the Stalls, prices decrease the further back you go, but you may find that you feel a little cut-off from the stage if you are right at the back. The Dress Circle is divided into three sections around the stairwells with the best seats being in the front section. Towards the rear Dress, the overhang from the Upper Circle may affect the view.

The highest seating level at the Savoy is the Upper Circle. As this section is the furthest from the stage, the views are not as good and you may feel considerably far from the going’s-on below. Prices here are the cheapest however, so if you are on a budget then the Upper Circle is your best bet, with some great views towards the front of this section. The Upper Circle is divided into a front and rear section, with the front providing the best overall views. There are safety rails running along the balcony which can obstruct those in the front couple of rows. The rear section feels very high and detached from the action, although there is an overall clear view. Savoy Theatre
Savoy Theatre

Accessibility

The seating at the Savoy Theatre is split into 3 levels, those of the Stalls, Dress Circle and Upper Circle. There is street level access into the theatre from the Carting Lane entrance, which leads directly into the Dress Circle, although visitors should note that this entrance is a 10 minute walk from the main foyer. There are 75 steps to the Stalls from the foyer, and 32 steps down to the Dress Circle. Concessions are available to all disabled patrons and their carers.

There are 2 spaces for wheelchair users in the Dress Circle, which are easily accessible via the Carting Lane entrance. Transfer seats are available in rows F and G of the Dress Circle although getting to these seats does require navigating 2 steps, with aisle seats providing the best leg room. There is an adapted toilet on the level of the Dress Circle. Level access is unavailable for all the bars within the theatre, but drinks can be arranged to be brought to patrons in their seats.

There is a portable box radio system available to those with hearing difficulties. Guide dogs are welcome within the auditorium and can stay with their owner during the show provided that they are sitting in an aisle seat. If requested, a member of staff can dog-sit during the show.Access bookings telephone line 020 7492 9930 or access booking form

History

The Savoy Theatre opened in 1881 and hosted the original comic operas of Gilbert and Sullivan, making the theatre synonymous with hosting quality dramas. Designed by C. J. Phipps, the Savoy was innovative in its use of electric lamps above gaslight, and later became the first public building in the world to be entirely lit by electricity. Upon opening the theatre was used as the home of Richard D’Oyly Carte’s opera company, later making way for Gilbert and Sullivan’s pieces and dramatic works including Shakespeare. In 1929 the building was closed by renovation and opened with a number of famous shows including the first performances of Noel Coward’s Blithe Spirit.

In 1990 disaster struck when the theatre was gutted by fire during restorations, although it was swiftly renovated with a seating capacity of 1158. The 1990s saw a parade of acclaimed productions and acting talent, with plays by writers including Noel Coward, Alan Ayckbourn and Tom Stoppard all being performed. The D’Oyly Carte opera company also revived productions including Iolanthe and The Mikado during this period.

Today, the theatre is part of the Ambassador Theatre Group and has hosted musicals such as Take That’s Never Forget and Dreamboats and Petticoats. It  was home to Legally Blonde the Musical, which opened to critical and popular acclaim in 2010. In recent times the theatre has been home to a musical version of Dirty Rotten Scoundrels starring Robert Lindsay which played for a year.

Past shows